Technology

Yesterday AARP launched the Health Law Guide, an interactive tool designed and developed by CDG in partnership with Avalere Health LLC. The Guide helps users understand how they will personally be impacted by the new health care law, the Affordable Care Act—both now and in the future.

Health_law_guide

To use the tool, users answer several questions about their personal situation (age, income, health insurance status, etc.). Based on the data, the survey provides the user with a personal report that he or she can view online, download, and print. The results page also includes a timeline that gives an overview of how your coverage will change year by year as the law is implemented.

Avalere Health, which prepared all of the content and source data for the Guide, chose CDG to design and develop the interactive tool. The result of the collaboration is a hugely useful tool for people who are wondering how exactly the new health care law will affect them personally.

“The real challenge to this project was giving people an easy way to consume and understand a great deal of complex information,” says Matthew Snyder, CDG’s creative director. “We developed a very straightforward and intuitive user interface with a welcoming look-and-feel to ensure that people would feel confident and comfortable using the tool and understanding their personal reports.”

We are pleased to help Avalere and the AARP answer the needs of millions of individuals who are seeking understand the personal impact of the ACA.

Need an interactive solution for your audience? Contact CDG.

Stevejobs It’s a sad day at CDG, as we remember the passing of the great Steve Jobs—someone who truly lived up to the overused descriptors of visionary, genius, game-changer, and legend. None of us ever met Mr. Jobs in person (although some CDG-ers had  a sighting of him at Apple headquarters while working on one of the first iAds), but we feel a palpable sense of loss for someone who moved our industry—and our culture—so far, so fast.

Thank you, Steve, for shepherding us into the future. We will miss you.

Stevejobs It’s a sad day at CDG, as we remember the passing of the great Steve Jobs—someone who truly lived up to the overused descriptors of visionary, genius, game-changer, and legend. None of us ever met Mr. Jobs in person (although some CDG-ers had  a sighting of him at Apple headquarters while working on one of the first iAds), but we feel a palpable sense of loss for someone who moved our industry—and our culture—so far, so fast.

Thank you, Steve, for shepherding us into the future. We will miss you.

Cq-rollcall-homepage

Just as the 2012 election cycle got hotter than a fried butterstick in Iowa, CDG launched a new and improved site for CQ Roll Call.

CQ Roll Call is the premier provider of non-partisan legislative and electoral news and analysis, as well as legislative tracking and advocacy tools. The new site features a streamlined structure that gives users a comprehensive, yet concise picture of what CQ Roll Call has to offer.

But it’s not only end-users who enjoy a better experience on the site—so do the editors and producers at CQ Roll Call. The new site was implemented in Zeus, CDG’s content management system. Zeus’ powerful functionality and intuitive interface makes it easy for CQ Roll Call to add, edit, and manage the site content.

Also, Zeus allows CQ Roll Call to track the users who request free trials of their products—information that had previously gone un-captured. With its new Zeus-powered site, CQ Roll Call can track conversions precisely and communicate more effectively with its current and potential subscribers.

“The new website is a great showcase for our products and services,” says Andrea Birdsong, Director of Interactive Marketing at CQ Roll Call, “And because we can better manage our content and track our conversions, we can serve our subscribers more effectively.”

So, Beltway insiders and intrepid politicos, visit the new CQRollCall.com and see if it gets your vote of approval.

Looking to improve your website? Contact CDG Interactive.

Cq-rollcall-homepage

Just as the 2012 election cycle got hotter than a fried butterstick in Iowa, CDG launched a new and improved site for CQ Roll Call.

CQ Roll Call is the premier provider of non-partisan legislative and electoral news and analysis, as well as legislative tracking and advocacy tools. The new site features a streamlined structure that gives users a comprehensive, yet concise picture of what CQ Roll Call has to offer.

But it’s not only end-users who enjoy a better experience on the site—so do the editors and producers at CQ Roll Call. The new site was implemented in Zeus, CDG’s content management system. Zeus’ powerful functionality and intuitive interface makes it easy for CQ Roll Call to add, edit, and manage the site content.

Also, Zeus allows CQ Roll Call to track the users who request free trials of their products—information that had previously gone un-captured. With its new Zeus-powered site, CQ Roll Call can track conversions precisely and communicate more effectively with its current and potential subscribers.

“The new website is a great showcase for our products and services,” says Andrea Birdsong, Director of Interactive Marketing at CQ Roll Call, “And because we can better manage our content and track our conversions, we can serve our subscribers more effectively.”

So, Beltway insiders and intrepid politicos, visit the new CQRollCall.com and see if it gets your vote of approval.

Looking to improve your website? Contact CDG Interactive.

  Gastro_logo Scan a parenting magazine and it won’t be long before you see headlines about celiac disease, reflux, GERD, and childhood obesity. Fortunately, there’s a new resource for parents and patients dealing digestive and nutritional disorders: GastroKids.org.

CDG created the site for our long-time client, The North American Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition (NASPGHAN). The association asked us to create a site geared to an audience parents and patients, rather than the doctors who typically visited their site.

In 2009, CDG had designed a site for NASPGHAN’s foundation, which contained a large amount of the parent and patient focused content as well as information for health care professionals. The design still held up well, as did the basic information architecture. So rather than start from scratch, we leveraged the design elements of the existing foundation and performed a “content redesign.”

We created a new logo and tagline to rebrand the site, but its essential look and feel remained the same. Meanwhile, we re-wrote and re-optimized content to focus it exclusively on the parent and patient audience. We extracted the information for medical professionals and housed it within NASPGHAN’s main site. The result: two specific destinations for two very different audiences.

We implemented the site in Zeus, CDG’s content management system, making it easy for site administrators to add, manage, and remove content (including meta content). This was a key concern for NASPGHAN, as it has plans to grow the site into an ever-more robust resource for parents and kids.

Is your website ready for a tweak, a touch-up, or a full-on redesign? Contact CDG.

  Gastro_logo Scan a parenting magazine and it won’t be long before you see headlines about celiac disease, reflux, GERD, and childhood obesity. Fortunately, there’s a new resource for parents and patients dealing digestive and nutritional disorders: GastroKids.org.

CDG created the site for our long-time client, The North American Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition (NASPGHAN). The association asked us to create a site geared to an audience parents and patients, rather than the doctors who typically visited their site.

In 2009, CDG had designed a site for NASPGHAN’s foundation, which contained a large amount of the parent and patient focused content as well as information for health care professionals. The design still held up well, as did the basic information architecture. So rather than start from scratch, we leveraged the design elements of the existing foundation and performed a “content redesign.”

We created a new logo and tagline to rebrand the site, but its essential look and feel remained the same. Meanwhile, we re-wrote and re-optimized content to focus it exclusively on the parent and patient audience. We extracted the information for medical professionals and housed it within NASPGHAN’s main site. The result: two specific destinations for two very different audiences.

We implemented the site in Zeus, CDG’s content management system, making it easy for site administrators to add, manage, and remove content (including meta content). This was a key concern for NASPGHAN, as it has plans to grow the site into an ever-more robust resource for parents and kids.

Is your website ready for a tweak, a touch-up, or a full-on redesign? Contact CDG.

Just when businesses were starting to figure out how to use channels like Twitter and Facebook and  LinkedIn, along comes Google with its new entry into the social media fray, called Google+ (pronounced “Google Plus”).

Google PlusIf you’ve heard any chatter about it recently, it’s probably been from people looking for one of the initially scarce number of invitations to the closed beta launch—or for someone with a shiny new Google+ account who was now trying to figure out what the heck to do with it.

So what does Google+ mean for businesses, anyway?

To start with, here’s what it doesn’t mean: a Google+ profile for your business. As we mentioned in Friday’s Links post, Google is asking only individuals to create Plus accounts because they have a business-centric version still in the works. This is very similar to Facebook’s model of profiles for individuals and pages for entities, like a business or organization.

However, if you’ve received an individual invitation for a Gmail account that you use in a professional capacity, you should pay attention to Google+ and use it to drive traffic to your company’s site or blog in much the same way you would use Twitter or Facebook, as Shashi Bellamkonda writes in Small Biz Technology.

For now, therefore, Google+ is more about your personal brand than your company brand, so proceed accordingly.

[Update 7.14.11]

The blog posts and article about G+ have been coming fast and furious from sources around the web; here are some additional takes:

Your Turn:

  • Are you using Google+?
  • What do you like—and dislike—about it?
  • What do you think its potential is for businesses and organizations?

Just when businesses were starting to figure out how to use channels like Twitter and Facebook and  LinkedIn, along comes Google with its new entry into the social media fray, called Google+ (pronounced “Google Plus”).

Google PlusIf you’ve heard any chatter about it recently, it’s probably been from people looking for one of the initially scarce number of invitations to the closed beta launch—or for someone with a shiny new Google+ account who was now trying to figure out what the heck to do with it.

So what does Google+ mean for businesses, anyway?

To start with, here’s what it doesn’t mean: a Google+ profile for your business. As we mentioned in Friday’s Links post, Google is asking only individuals to create Plus accounts because they have a business-centric version still in the works. This is very similar to Facebook’s model of profiles for individuals and pages for entities, like a business or organization.

However, if you’ve received an individual invitation for a Gmail account that you use in a professional capacity, you should pay attention to Google+ and use it to drive traffic to your company’s site or blog in much the same way you would use Twitter or Facebook, as Shashi Bellamkonda writes in Small Biz Technology.

For now, therefore, Google+ is more about your personal brand than your company brand, so proceed accordingly.

[Update 7.14.11]

The blog posts and article about G+ have been coming fast and furious from sources around the web; here are some additional takes:

Your Turn:

  • Are you using Google+?
  • What do you like—and dislike—about it?
  • What do you think its potential is for businesses and organizations?

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